PBS’ O’Brien says he’ll be OK after losing arm

     This image released by PBS shows PBS science correspondent Miles O'Brien during the taping of an interview for

    This image released by PBS shows PBS science correspondent Miles O'Brien during the taping of an interview for "PBS Newshour," on Friday, March 7, 2014. O'Brien lost part of his arm in an accident while on assignment in Japan last February. (PBS/AP Photo)

    PBS science correspondent Miles O’Brien says he’ll be OK, despite having most of his left arm amputated only three weeks ago.

    O’Brien underwent emergency surgery on Feb. 14 after a blow to his arm from a heavy suitcase led to a life-threatening condition. He had first disclosed the ordeal on his blog on Feb. 25.

    He also proudly announced while appearing on “PBS NewsHour” that he tied his own necktie Friday morning.

    O’Brien recalled feeling his arm when he awoke from the surgery. But he says it was phantom pain, which has continued plaguing him.

    He is back at work, and says he looks forward to again being able to pilot planes and shoot news video.

    He calls the challenge “surmountable” and told well-wishers not to worry about him.

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