On ‘Radio Times’: Trump taps Christie’s ‘Bridgegate’ defense attorney to head FBI

 In this Jan. 12, 2005 file photo, Assistant Attorney General, Christopher Wray speaks at a press conference at the Justice Dept. in Washington. President Donald Trump has picked a longtime lawyer and former Justice Department official to be the next FBI director. Trump said on Twitter Wednesday that he will be nominating Christopher Wray, calling him 'a man of impeccable credentials.' (Lawrence Jackson/AP Photo)

In this Jan. 12, 2005 file photo, Assistant Attorney General, Christopher Wray speaks at a press conference at the Justice Dept. in Washington. President Donald Trump has picked a longtime lawyer and former Justice Department official to be the next FBI director. Trump said on Twitter Wednesday that he will be nominating Christopher Wray, calling him 'a man of impeccable credentials.' (Lawrence Jackson/AP Photo)

On Radio Times Wednesday, host Marty Moss-Coane was joined by NPR’s Ron Elving and The Hill’s Reid Wilson. Elving laid out Christopher Wray’s background as “head of the criminal division at the Justice Department under President George W. Bush, a very important and prominent position.

President Trump tweeted this morning that he was nominating Christopher Wray to head the FBI. The announcement comes one day before former-FBI Director James Comey testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee about potential obstruction of justice by the President.

On Radio Times Wednesday, host Marty Moss-Coane was joined by NPR’s Ron Elving and The Hill’s Reid Wilson. Elving laid out Wray’s background as “head of the criminal division at the Justice Department under President George W. Bush, a very important and prominent position. Since then, he has been a white-collar criminal attorney and is probably best known to [WHYY] listeners as the defense attorney to New Jersey Governor Chis Christie in the ‘Bridgegate’ case.”

As far as the timing of this announcement coming one day before Comey’s testimony, Wilson said it’s “sort of like shooting off a cap gun in order to distract from a train crash.”

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