Old Silverliner sale pushed back

Although SEPTA’s new Silverliner V train made a smooth run during its unveiling last week, it has since run into some minor problems.

SEPTA had to take the train out of service Monday and Tuesday to address “little glitches” that cropped up in the propulsion system and to software related to the cab signal system, according to spokeswoman Jerri Williams.

The cab signal system is designed to prevent crashes by verifying that the track ahead is clear of other trains.

Repairs were successful, she said, and the train was back making its scheduled runs on Wednesday.

(A list of scheduled runs can be found here.)

Williams added that the issues weren’t indicative of larger problems with the Silverliner V train, which she said has been “running very well.”

“Since it’s the first one, they want everything to be as perfect as possible. … This is the time to pull it in and make those adjustments,” she said.

This train is the first of a fleet of new regional rail trains that will replace the aging Silverliner II and Silverliner III cars and help SEPTA handle projected ridership increases.

The three pilot cars that make up the train are the first of 120 that are being manufactured by Hyundai Rotem in a plant in South Korea and assembled in South Philadelphia.

Nine more cars are expected by December, with nine to 10 additional cars rolling off the assembly line every month after that.

However, delays in production have caused SEPTA to push back its plan to sell its old railcars. Hyundai has experienced quality-control problems at the South Philadelphia plant and has had trouble establishing an efficient assembly line, according to a SEPTA report.

The authority had set an original deadline of last week to bid for the 73 cars and has pushed that back to Feb. 9.

Williams said that the authority will also reserve the right to retain the railcars even after they’re sold until enough Silverliner Vs are brought online to maintain regional rail service levels.

Contact the reporter at acampisi@planphilly.com

Although SEPTA’s new Silverliner V train made a smooth run during its unveiling last week, it has since run into some minor problems.

SEPTA had to take the train out of service Monday and Tuesday to address “little glitches” that cropped up in the propulsion system and to software related to the cab signal system, according to spokeswoman Jerri Williams.

The cab signal system is designed to prevent crashes by verifying that the track ahead is clear of other trains.

Repairs were successful, she said, and the train was back making its scheduled runs on Wednesday.

(A list of scheduled runs can be found here.)

Williams added that the issues weren’t indicative of larger problems with the Silverliner V train, which she said has been “running very well.”

“Since it’s the first one, they want everything to be as perfect as possible. … This is the time to pull it in and make those adjustments,” she said.

This train is the first of a fleet of new regional rail trains that will replace the aging Silverliner II and Silverliner III cars and help SEPTA handle projected ridership increases.

The three pilot cars that make up the train are the first of 120 that are being manufactured by Hyundai Rotem in a plant in South Korea and assembled in South Philadelphia.

Nine more cars are expected by December, with nine to 10 additional cars rolling off the assembly line every month after that.

However, delays in production have caused SEPTA to push back its plan to sell its old railcars. Hyundai has experienced quality-control problems at the South Philadelphia plant and has had trouble establishing an efficient assembly line, according to a SEPTA report.

The authority had set an original deadline of last week to bid for the 73 cars and has pushed that back to Feb. 9.

Williams said that the authority will also reserve the right to retain the railcars even after they’re sold until enough Silverliner Vs are brought online to maintain regional rail service levels.

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