NRA exemption from campaign regulation revolts some

    They’re angered over special treatment given to the National Rifle Association in campaign finance legislation.

    In Washington, House Democrats face a revolt by traditional allies. They’re angered over special treatment given to the National Rifle Association in campaign finance legislation.

    The Disclose Act (H.R. 5175) is an attempt to counter a recent Supreme Court decision that lifts campaign spending restrictions from corporations, unions and nonprofit advocacy groups.

    But opposition by liberals has left the fate of the legislation in doubt.

    Congressman Bob Brady (D-Philadelphia) says the bill focuses on transparency.

    “What the Supreme Court said is that corporations can spend an unlimited amount of money,” says Brady, “and don’t have to identify themselves for or against their candidate. And what our premise is, is who’s paying for it? Who’s saying it?”

    Democrats like Brady agreed to exempt the NRA from some of the new disclosure requirements after concluding the gun owners’ group had enough allies in the House to stop the bill.

    Some liberal groups are criticizing the proposal. Others say it’s a needed compromise to prevent what could create unlimited and undisclosed influence-peddling by corporations.

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