N.J. colleges may have to limit tuition hikes to get federal stimulus dollars

    By Phil Gregory

    If New Jersey’s public four-year colleges want their share of $32 million worth of federal stimulus money, they won’t be able to raise their tuition or fees more than 3 percent this year.

    By Phil Gregory

    If New Jersey’s public four-year colleges want their share of $32 million worth of federal stimulus money, they won’t be able to raise their tuition or fees more than 3 percent this year.

    Legislators have written that limitation into the proposed budget they’re working on. But a key college official says they didn’t have to.

    The New Jersey Association of State Colleges and Universities says colleges will find ways to cut costs while still providing quality education. The Association’s Chief Executive Officer Darryl Greer says college presidents agreed among themselves weeks ago that tuition and fee hikes would not exceed 3 percent.

    Listen:

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    Greer: We’re happy on the issue of affordability. We’re a little bit disappointed that the legislature feels it has to write a cap in because Presidents are dedicated to low tuition increases in the first place.

    Greer says negotiations continue with unions representing faculty and it is still uncertain whether there will be layoffs or wage freezes at the campuses.

    Another provision of the proposed budget would let colleges avoid forcing employees to take unpaid days off, if they cut personnel costs.
    The Legislature is expected to vote by the end of this week on the budget for the fiscal year that begins next month.

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