New app helps congregations assess their risks and plan accordingly

     In this June 19, 2015 file photo, police tape surrounds the parking lot behind the AME Emanuel Church as FBI forensic experts work the crime scene, in Charleston, S.C. (Stephen B. Morton/AP Photo, File)

    In this June 19, 2015 file photo, police tape surrounds the parking lot behind the AME Emanuel Church as FBI forensic experts work the crime scene, in Charleston, S.C. (Stephen B. Morton/AP Photo, File)

    Julia Menzo of Lutheran Disaster Response in Eastern Pennsylvania helped develop the app and she discussed that work with NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller.

    On this second day of the penalty phase of Dylann Roof’s murder trial, jurors heard emotional accounts from the loved ones of nine parishioners killed at Charleston’s historic Mother Emanuel AME Church in June, 2015. This and other acts of violence in the nation’s houses of worship has heightened the need for advance planning to face all kinds of disaster.

    Now, there is a new avail to aid in that preparation: an app developed by the National Institute of Justice helps congregations assess their risks and plan accordingly.

    Julia Menzo of Lutheran Disaster Response in Eastern Pennsylvania helped develop the app and she discussed that work with NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller. Listen to their conversation below.

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