NAFTA’s effects on the United States are more complex than Trump claims

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      In this Wednesday, June 29, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama shakes hands with Mexican President Enrique Pena Neito during their bilateral meeting at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, Canada. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

    In this Wednesday, June 29, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama shakes hands with Mexican President Enrique Pena Neito during their bilateral meeting at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, Canada. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

    During the presidential campaign, both Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton talk a lot about creating jobs and bringing jobs back to the United States. 

    But where did the U.S. jobs go?

    In speeches delivered at campaign stops in Pennsylvnia and elsewhere, Donald Trump has called the North American Free Trade Agreement — or NAFTA — the “worst trade deal in the history of the country,” claiming it sent jobs to Mexico.

    Is that really true?

    Mauro F. Guillén is professor of International Management at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, and he joined Newsworks Tonight’s Brad Linder to examine the impact of NAFTA on U.S. jobs and more specifically to Pennsylvania.

    You can hear their conversation below.

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