Milton Street may get stricken from the mayoral-primary ballot after all

 T. Milton Street Sr. faces a resuscitated challenge to his mayoral candidacy in the Democratic primary. (Brad Larrison/for NewsWorks)

T. Milton Street Sr. faces a resuscitated challenge to his mayoral candidacy in the Democratic primary. (Brad Larrison/for NewsWorks)

Remember all those stories about T. Milton Street Sr. apparently fending off residency, registration and marital-status challenges and remaining eligible to appear on the Democratic mayoral-primary ballot in May? Well, not so fast. 

You see, it looks like Common Pleas Court Judge Chris Wogan’s decision will be appealed.

The challenge was filed on behalf of Joseph Coccio Jr., the secretary-treasurer of the Transit Workers Union, Local 234. That’s the largest union representing SEPTA employees, and it has endorsed mayoral candidate Tony Williams (though attorney  Kevin Greenberg publicly stated the case wasn’t brought on behalf of any of Street’s competitors).

Greenberg confirmed to NinetyNine on Wednesday morning that a notice to appeal has, in fact, been filed “because Milton Street was a registered Independent who resides in New Jersey instead of being a Philadelphia Democrat” (PDF).

“The real meat gets filed on Monday,” said Greenberg, noting that that’s when briefs are due under the Commonwealth Court order.

Translation: the notice of appeal (already filed) and statement of questions (to be filed Wednesday) are pretty boring in his estimation.

Suffice it to say, Street is unhappy about these latest developments, and blames Williams for it.

“Sen. Williams cannot win this election on the strength of his record but has to win through shadow Political Action Committees, surrogate petitioners in court proceedings, and frivolous lawsuits and motions,” Street said. “I intend to fight to remain as I am, a viable candidate representing the people Senator Williams would overlook.”

His campaign spokesperson, Angela Foster-Griffin, issued a release Tuesday night regarding the appeal itself.

Below are portions of that statement that won’t get NinetyNine sued to share publicly:

I have now learned that an appeal has been filed by the supporters of Senator Anthony H. Williams to once again attempt to silence my voice in the primary election for mayor. It is clear based on this frivolous and desperate attempt, that Senator Williams and his emissaries are concerned about my candidacy.

Although, the Court of Common Pleas made a ruling based on facts and evidence and was not swayed by the innuendo and unsubstantiated statements made by Kevin Greenberg, the attorney representing the named client in the complaint. The courts upheld my right to be a candidate and the voters chance to vote for a candidate of their choice.

Mr. Greenberg has publicly stated his support and association with the Williams campaign and that’s how we view this matter. Senator Williams cannot win this election on the strength of his record but has to win through shadow Political Action Committees, surrogate petitioners in court proceedings, and frivolous law suits and motions. I intend to fight to remain as I am, a viable candidate representing the people Senator Williams would overlook.

During the appeal, I intend to be available to the press and public each day to update those that are interested in this matter. I will also highlight each day an area as to why my candidacy is of concern to Senator Williams and his supporters based on his own failed legislative initiatives or lack of action to fight for the children of our public schools and residents of the City of Philadelphia.

NinetyNine reached out to the Williams campaign for comment. 

“Milton continues to be Milton,” responded Williams campaign spokesman Albert L. Butler.

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