Getting to the March For Science was its own journey

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     Janine Krippner (left) and Becky Tisherman (right) were two young scientists that attended the science march in Washington, D.C. Though they knew early on they would go, their motivations evolved in the months leading up to the march. (Irina Zhorov/The Pulse)

    Janine Krippner (left) and Becky Tisherman (right) were two young scientists that attended the science march in Washington, D.C. Though they knew early on they would go, their motivations evolved in the months leading up to the march. (Irina Zhorov/The Pulse)

    We followed two scientists starting from the inauguration in January to the March for Science in April.

     

    March for Science, which happened in Washington, D.C. and more than 600 cities around the world on Earth Day, mobilized scientists and their supporters in an unusually visible way.

    For some attendees, it was personal — jobs and research funding suddenly seemed on the line as President Trump introduced a budget with steep cuts to science-heavy agencies. Others said they attended because they believe science, done in the public’s interest, is being threatened.

    Either way, getting to Washington, D.C. for the march was a journey both physical — people came from all over the country — and self-reflective. We followed a couple of young scientists starting shortly after the inauguration, in January, as they parsed out why, exactly, they decided to march. And we were there as Bill Nye lit up the crowd during the event.

    These scientists walked away with lessons to take back to the academy, the lab, and the field, as well.

    “I hope that this inspires people who work in science gets them motivated to communicate what they’re doing to everyone,” said Becky Tisherman. “I’m studying rivers, I’m studying volcanoes, here’s what’s happening with them, here’s why you should care, get rid of the jargon and just be able to communicate what you’re saying so people would care about it.”

    Listen to their journey here.

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