Forecast calls for brilliant fall foliage

Even though some leaves are  turning brown because of below-normal rainfall

Even though some leaves are turning brown because of below-normal rainfall

After all the hot weather during the summer, lower temperatures could produce a vibrant fall foliage season.

Even though some leaves are already turning brown because of below-normal rainfall,Rutgers University professor and agriculture agent Bill Hlubik is forecasting a brilliant display of color in the coming weeks.

“A little bit of stress actually brings out even more color in some of the trees. If it’s extreme stress, they tend to drop their leaves early,” he said. “So if they’re not dropping their leaves and the leaves stay on, then we should be in for pretty spectacular fall color.”

Areas at higher elevations will be the first to have the colorful autumn display, Hlubik said, and that will spread to the rest of the region by mid-October.

“Oaks turn red, brown, or rusty color. Aspen-type trees are yellow and golden yellow. Dogwood can turn purplish, beech light tan,” he said by way of preview. “Maples can differ all over the place, usually you get scarlet to scarlet-red to orange colors. And I think you’re going to see all of those colors this season.”

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