Eagles underdog T-shirts unleash dollars for Philly schools

Philadelphia Eagles' Lane Johnson is seen during the second half of an NFL football game against the Denver Broncos, Sunday, Nov. 5, 2017, in Philadelphia.

Philadelphia Eagles' Lane Johnson is seen during the second half of an NFL football game against the Denver Broncos, Sunday, Nov. 5, 2017, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Michael Perez)

Vegas oddsmakers think the Eagles will lose in the NFC Championship game Sunday against the Minnesota Vikings. They also thought the Birds would lose last weekend to the Atlanta Falcons.

The team has embraced an underdog mentality, and one player is turning that into cash for Philly schools.

Earlier this week, offensive tackle Lane Johnson began selling T-shirts emblazoned with the phrase “Home Dogs Gonna Eat,” and donating all profits to the Fund for the School District of Philadelphia. The design harkens back to Saturday’s win over Atlanta, when Johnson and defensive end Chris Long left the field sporting German shepherd masks (the closest thing they could find to “underdog” masks.)

When Amazon predictably sold out of those masks following the big victory, Johnson procured extras and is now selling them online — with 65 percent of the profit going to Philly schools.

Between the masks and the shirts, which cost $18 a pop, Johnson has raised $100,000, he told Philly.com.

The school district confirmed 3,000 shirts sold in the first 24 hours, although officials did not have updated totals.

Long, Johnson’s mask-wearing accomplice, is donating his entire salary this season to educational causes in Philadelphia and his hometown of Charlottesville, Virginia.

Johnson, an All-Pro selection, also has a history of giving back to Philly schools.

In November, he announced he would donate all money made from his LJ65 clothing line to the Fund for School District of Philadelphia. Though it’s probably safe to assume, he’s never produced apparel quite this paw-pular.

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