Drug use among kids still misunderstood by parents, NJ study says

    By: Tom MacDonald

    A new study shows New Jersey parents aren’t fully aware of what drives their children to try drugs. The study also shows parents who eat meals with their children understand them better.

    By: Tom MacDonald
    tmacdonald@whyy.org

    A new study shows New Jersey parents aren’t fully aware of what drives their children to try drugs. The study also shows parents who eat meals with their children understand them better.

    Transcript:
    The study sponsored by the Partnership for a Drug-Free New Jersey shows parents think their children try drugs to be cool, while students report they use drugs as an escape from the pressures of school.

    Angelo Valente is Executive Director of the group.  He says parents also don’t understand the influence of a child’s friends on the decision to try drugs.

    Valente: “Overwhelmingly young people indicate that one of the great influences are their peers.  We don’t find that parents in New Jersey believe that.  Only a third of the parents in New Jersey believe that peer influence is one of the key factors.”

    The survey also shows parents who sit down to a meal with their children five or more times a week are more influential on their children’s attitudes towards drugs and alcohol.

    More information:
    Press Release – Regular Family Meals Increase Conservations Between Parents and Children about Substance Abuse Prevention. Release includes several more key findings and a link to the full survey available as a Power Point presentation.

    Listen:
    Click on the play button below or right click on this link and choose “Save Link As” to download.

    [audio: sci20090324drugs.mp3]

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