DROP may not die easily

    On Tuesday Mayor Michael Nutter called for an end to the DROP retirement incentive program. The program costs the city more than $20 million a year. Ending the practice might not be easy.

    On Tuesday Mayor Michael Nutter called for an end to the DROP retirement incentive program.  The program costs the city more than $20 million a year. Ending the practice might not be easy.

    Mayor Nutter says the city can’t afford DROP, but Councilman Frank Rizzo, who is enrolled in the program, says he isn’t ready to vote to end it, especially for those employees who are already working for the city.

    “There’s a lot of questions there’s a lot of gray area and that’s why at this point I’m not ready to say if the DROP program should be eliminated or not.”

    Councilman Bill Green was in favor of eliminating DROP for politicians, and is ready to end it for all city employees, but question’s the mayor’s timing.

    “It’s right before the Spring election season and it’s a popular issue for the mayor to be pushing”

    The Fraternal Order of Police and other unions are already waging their own campaign to defeat the bill and keep the retirement incentive in place.

    Councilman Frank DiCicco is calling for a rare special session of council to discuss the issue.

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