Detecting developmental delays at an early age

    A new law set to go in effect next week makes Delaware the first state in the country to require coverage of developmental screenings for infants and toddlers.

    A new law will make Delaware the first state in the country to require coverage of developmental screenings for infants and toddlers.
    Beginning next week, private insurance carriers will be required to reimburse doctors for medically approved developmental screenings for children from birth to age three.

    Lt. Governor Denn announced the new law at the annual luncheon of the State Council for Persons with Disabilities on Monday. The new law will allow doctors to detect more developmental delays and developmental problems in children at a younger age when they can be successfully treated.

    web xclusive banner

     

    The Delaware law is a result of House Bill 199, which was written by Lieutenant Governor Matt Denn, State Representative Terry Schooley (D-Newark) and State Senator Patricia Blevins (D-Elsmere). The bill was signed by Governor Markell in August and gave insurance companies a 90-day period to prepare for its implementation.

    Diagnosing disabilities in children at an earlier age has been a top priority for Denn since the start of his campaign for Lt. Governor in 2008. It was also part of his “Kids Agenda” this year. “It’s very exciting that in just a few days,” Denn says, “kids will actually start to receive these screenings.”

    The new law will take effect on November 25.

    Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

    It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.