Cheating probe underway at Pa. State Police academy

     Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf vows that if cheating occurred at the State Police academy,

    Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf vows that if cheating occurred at the State Police academy, "people will pay the price." (AP file photo)

    The head of the Pennsylvania State Police has confirmed an ongoing investigation into “suspected cheating” at the agency’s training academy.

     

    State Police Commissioner Tyree Blocker said in a written statement Thursday that the review began last December into suspected cheating among cadets training to be state troopers.

    Pledging to “leave no stone unturned,” Blocker said the investigation has included “dozens” of interviews and evidence collection.

    “I will make sure that each and every person involved is held accountable,” said the commissioner.

    The written statement does not detail the type of cheating suspected or the scope of the ongoing investigation, although the commissioner referred to the current 144th class of State Police cadets.

    WHTM-TV, which broke the story of the internal investigation, has reported that 144th class cadets, as well as former cadets, are thought to have shared answers on a written test.

    “The State Police asks for the public’s patience throughout the remainder of this comprehensive, on-going, internal investigation,” said Blocker in his statement. “To that end, the agency also stresses that not every cadet who has departed from the 144th class is necessarily implicated in the investigation.”

    Blocker’s comments Thursday represent an about-face for the agency, which days ago had refused to comment on reports of an internal probe.

    But on Wednesday, Gov. Tom Wolf got out in front of the commissioner when he was asked about possible cheating by State Police trainees.

    “We’ll work out the best way to find out if cheating actually went on,” said Wolf, “and if it went on, people will pay the price.”

    Cadets of the 144th class began their training in September and are slated to graduate next month.

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