Sweetening the city’s pot: Why Philadelphia is still grappling with the soda tax

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In this March 16, 2017 photo, customer Fran Flanagan is interviewed as he shops for soda at the IGA supermarket in the Port Richmond neighborhood of Philadelphia. The city's tax on sweetened drinks remains controversial two years later. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

In this March 16, 2017 photo, customer Fran Flanagan is interviewed as he shops for soda at the IGA supermarket in the Port Richmond neighborhood of Philadelphia. The city's tax on sweetened drinks remains controversial two years later. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

It’s been almost three years since Philadelphia passed its sweetened beverage tax, better known as the “soda tax.” Mayor Jim Kenney said it would help bring in millions for expanding access to pre-K, and fixing up the city’s parks, recreation centers, and libraries. But it remains controversial. Many Philadelphians don’t like it. The beverage industry continues to fight it. And some retailers say the tax is hurting their businesses. Now, the soda tax is one of the biggest hurdles Kenney faces in his re-election bid. Why isn’t it settled policy? WHYY’s Dave Davies and PlanPhilly contributor Malcolm Burnley join us on this episode of The Why.

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