Donate

Report: Students aren’t aware of basic U.S. slavery history

Listen 21:04
ADVANCE FOR USE SATURDAY, FEB. 6, AND THEREAFTER - FILE - This is an undated 1860's file photo of a military police detachment, known as provost guards, of the 107th U.S. Colored Infantry lined up at Fort Corcoran near Washington, D.C. It's been 150 years since black soldiers from U.S. Colored Infantry units began returning home from their service in the South, where more than 175,000 members fought - and in some cases, died - to free fellow African-Americans from slavery. (AP Photo/Library of Congress, File)

ADVANCE FOR USE SATURDAY, FEB. 6, AND THEREAFTER - FILE - This is an undated 1860's file photo of a military police detachment, known as provost guards, of the 107th U.S. Colored Infantry lined up at Fort Corcoran near Washington, D.C. It's been 150 years since black soldiers from U.S. Colored Infantry units began returning home from their service in the South, where more than 175,000 members fought - and in some cases, died - to free fellow African-Americans from slavery. (AP Photo/Library of Congress, File)

We talk with MAUREEN COSTELLO, teaching tolerance director at the Southern Poverty Law Center, about a new report that says U.S. schools aren’t adequately teaching American students about the history of slavery.

Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

Help us get to 100% of our membership goal to support the reporters covering our region, the producers bringing you great local programs and the educators who teach all our children.