Philadelphia Carriage Company ends; Miss America controversy

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Miss New York Nina Davuluri, reacts after being named Miss America 2014 pageant as Miss America 2013 Mallory Hagan celebrate with her. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Miss New York Nina Davuluri, reacts after being named Miss America 2014 pageant as Miss America 2013 Mallory Hagan celebrate with her. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

The Miss America pageant has been a tradition in American culture for 96 years. The annual competition has evolved into a scholarship program for women between the ages 17 and 24. Last week, leaked emails show several executives of Miss America making disparaging comments about current and former contestants. The fallout has been huge. The television producing partner Dick Clark Productions cut ties, Atlantic City’s mayor-elect plans to terminate its contract with the pageant, former Miss America winners are speaking out and three CEOs have resigned. In this hour, we talk with New York Times opinion writer, JENNIFER WEINER, HILARY LEVEY FRIEDMAN of Brown University and MALLORY HAGAN, Miss America 2013, about the controversy, the future of Miss America and pageant culture in America. But first, COUNCILMAN MARK SQUILLA talks to us about the end of the Philadelphia Carriage Company and where its horses will end up at the end of the year.

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