Does the U.S. need a truth and reconciliation commission?

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City officials and members of the Pathways to Reform, Transformation and Reconciliation steering committee join hands at the Octavius Catto statue for a moment of silence. The committee was formed after the murder of George Floyd and the civil unrest that followed. (Emma Lee/WHYY)

City officials and members of the Pathways to Reform, Transformation and Reconciliation steering committee join hands at the Octavius Catto statue for a moment of silence. The committee was formed after the murder of George Floyd and the civil unrest that followed. (Emma Lee/WHYY)

After the social unrest prompted by the murder of George Floyd, some are asking: Is it finally time for the U.S. to establish a Truth and Reconciliation Commission? Today, we’ll discuss the global and historical precedents for creating Truth Commissions in the wake of atrocity, efforts already underway in the US, and what establishing such a commission could mean moving forward. Our guests are DR. CHARLES CHAVIS, assistant professor of conflict resolution and history at George Mason University and DR. KELEBOGILE ZVOBGO, assistant professor of government at William & Mary, and founder and director of the International Justice Lab. 

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