Voter turnout critical to Pa. Supreme Court race

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 State Superior Court judge Christine Donohue, from right, state Superior Court Judge David Wecht, Philadelphia Judge Paul Panepinto, state Superior Court Judge Judith Olson, Adams County, Pa., Judge Michael George, Philadelphia Judge Kevin Dougherty and state Commonwealth Court Judge Anne Covey participate in a Pennsylvania Supreme Court debate, Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015, at the Widener University Commonwealth Law School in Harrisburg, Pa. On Nov. 3, voters will fill three vacancies on the seven-member state Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

State Superior Court judge Christine Donohue, from right, state Superior Court Judge David Wecht, Philadelphia Judge Paul Panepinto, state Superior Court Judge Judith Olson, Adams County, Pa., Judge Michael George, Philadelphia Judge Kevin Dougherty and state Commonwealth Court Judge Anne Covey participate in a Pennsylvania Supreme Court debate, Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015, at the Widener University Commonwealth Law School in Harrisburg, Pa. On Nov. 3, voters will fill three vacancies on the seven-member state Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

Election organizers worry there could be some very lonely workers at polling places tomorrow.

One local politician is trying to combat that by talking about the historic race for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

 

For the first time in centuries, Pennsylvania voters will elect three new members to the state supreme court.

One of the Democrats hoping to get elected to the supreme court is Kevin Dougherty, brother of the power electricians union official John Dougherty.  

“The key to winning this election is having everyone come out to vote not only in Philadelphia but in surrounding counties, but concentrating on this area the southeast,” he said.

U.S. Rep. Bob Brady (D-Philadelphia) is also head of the Philadelphia Democratic Party.  He says turnout in the city is key for the race to fill three vacancies on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

“I cannot be responsible or predict what the rest of the state is going to do but I can tell you that if there’s a large turnout in the city of Philadelphia we will be successful.” Brady said.

Democrats think they need to get at least 30 percent voter turnout in Philadelphia to win all three open seats on the court.  In the May primary, only 27 percent showed up to vote in the city.

During what is otherwise a sleepy election year in much of Pennsylvania, the contest for the high court is filling voters’ mailboxes with all sorts of campaign brochures and postcards telling them how significant this race is.

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