Top 5 stories of the week in NW Philly

 The Manayunk Development Corporation printed business-sized cards explaining the MNYKINDESS Project. Check out Emily Brooks' story for more information. (Emily Brooks/for NewsWorks)

The Manayunk Development Corporation printed business-sized cards explaining the MNYKINDESS Project. Check out Emily Brooks' story for more information. (Emily Brooks/for NewsWorks)

Here’s a look at what you might have missed:

1. Compromise reached in Germantown Cab Co. dispute with PPA

Last week, officials with the Philadelphia Parking Authority shut down the cab company after they found out it failed to submit proper documentation and background checks for its drivers. On Thursday, the two sides headed to Commonwealth Court in an effort to settle the matter and get the company’s cars back on the road. Check out Brian Hickey’s story for more details.

2. Roxborough recreation center ransacked during break-in

Sometime between closing last Saturday and the next morning, Kendrick Recreation Center was ransacked. Nothing was stolen, but windows were broken and a pair of offices was trashed, among other things. Check out Neema Roshania’s story for more details.

3. Northwest Philly councilmembers weigh in on pending marijuana-bust ordinance

City Councilman James Kenney wants Philadelphia to stop arresting people caught with small amounts of marijuana. He argues that a lot of police officers and a lot of money could be saved if, in certain circumstances, cops were able to hand out a summons for already established diversion program instead. We checked in with Northwest Philadelphia Councilmembers to get their thoughts on Kenney’s bill. Check out Brian Hickey’s story to learn more.

4. Manayunk looks to encourage random acts of kindness with new project

The Manayunk Development Corporation is looking promote a little positivity in the neighborhood through a new campaign they’re calling the MNYKINDNESS Project. The goal? To have residents create a chain of selfless acts that weaves through the neighborhood and beyond. Check out Emily Brooks’ story to learn more.

5. Camelot Schools drops pursuit of former Germantown High building

Over the summer, officials with the for-profit education company worked to move three of its programs to GHS. As the school year approached, officials with the School District of Philadelphia told Camelot the building needed to be inspected before students could move in. With summer in sight, and no inspection on the horizon, the company has decided to continue teaching its students at other properties. Check out Aaron Moselle’s story to learn more.

 

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