On ‘Radio Times’: Mitigating social media’s dark side

 This Sunday, April 16, 2017 frame from video posted on Facebook shows Robert Godwin Sr. in Cleveland moments before being fatally shot (left) and  A makeshift memorial consisting of balloons, a stuffed bear and other items sits a along a fence in Cleveland on Monday, April 17, 2017. The memorial honors a man who was fatally shot in a video that was posted to Facebook. (Facebook via AP and Mike Householder/AP Photo)

This Sunday, April 16, 2017 frame from video posted on Facebook shows Robert Godwin Sr. in Cleveland moments before being fatally shot (left) and A makeshift memorial consisting of balloons, a stuffed bear and other items sits a along a fence in Cleveland on Monday, April 17, 2017. The memorial honors a man who was fatally shot in a video that was posted to Facebook. (Facebook via AP and Mike Householder/AP Photo)

Facebook recently came under fire to prevent users from using their platform for criminal and immoral acts, due to a murder posted on their site in almost real-time.

It’s the latest example of social media’s darker side, which has also included live-streams of rapes, and torture, as well as persistent online harassment.On Thursday, Radio Times host Marty Moss-Coane was joined by Emily Dreyfuss, senior writer at WIRED who explained the current methods that Facebook employs to mitigate the inappropriate content, saying that it “takes time.”

Marty was also joined by University of Miami Law Mary Anne Franks who discussed how social media platforms by their very nature encourage users to commit crimes because “there is a certain element of performance in a lot of these horrific incidents.”

To hear more about mitigating crime on social media , listen to the full interview on Radio Times.

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