On ‘Radio Times:’ Lawrence Krauss explains the ‘curious accident’ of human existence

    Lawrence Krauss, theoretical physicist, chair of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Board of Sponsors, speaks during a news conference the at the National Press Club in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 26, 2107, announcing that the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist have moved the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock to two and a half minutes to midnight. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Lawrence Krauss, theoretical physicist, chair of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Board of Sponsors, speaks during a news conference the at the National Press Club in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 26, 2107, announcing that the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist have moved the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock to two and a half minutes to midnight. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Have you ever wondered why we’re here? That’s the question theoretical physicist, Lawrence Krauss asks and answers in his new book, The Greatest Story Ever Told—So Far.

    Krauss talks about the important role that science plays in the evolution of our understanding of the world and beyond. He says that we, meaning people, are a cosmic mistake and are NOT the center of the universe.

    In this clip, Marty-Moss Coane asks Krauss if he was raised in a religious household.

    “Not particular religious, but I was raised in a Jewish household,” Krauss said. “I wanted to believe. That’s the key thing. We all want to believe.”

    But he eventually grew up, Krauss says, and the religious stories he read as a child were just mere stories.

    “The only way to really learn something is to confront your own misconceptions,” Krauss says.

    To hear more of Krauss’ conversation with Marty, go to Radio Times.

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