David Thornburgh: Strike is short term win for union

    SEPTA and its major union have reached a contract settlement – and buses, trains and trolleys are running again. But trying to find which side won is more difficult.

    SEPTA and its major union have reached a contract settlement – and buses, trains and trolleys are running again. But trying to find which side won is more difficult.

    Listen:
    [audio: 091109tmcontract.mp3]

    Sources close to the talks say the five year deal includes a $1250 signing bonus, a more than 11% wage increase, and no health care co-pay increases for union workers.

    David Thornburgh is Executive Director of Penn’s Fels Institute of Government. He says there were really no winners in the walkout.

    Thornburgh: I think people’s impressions of the transit system kind of are more negative as the result of this strike and I don’t think the union has served itself well in terms of their long-term relationship with political figures and SEPTA management. I see it as a short term gain long term loss.

    It’s also unclear how much of the riding public will return to the city’s buses, subways, and trolleys. SEPTA officials say they’ll be watching ridership numbers over the next few days.

    Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

    It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.