NJ lawmakers delving into realities of fantasy sports

 Devlin D'Zmura, a tending news manager at DraftKings, a daily fantasy sports company, works on his laptop at the company's offices in Boston. New Jersey lawmakers are trying to determine if DraftKings and other fantasy sports operations are games of skill or chance -- and whether they should be regulated. (AP photo/Stephan Savoia)

Devlin D'Zmura, a tending news manager at DraftKings, a daily fantasy sports company, works on his laptop at the company's offices in Boston. New Jersey lawmakers are trying to determine if DraftKings and other fantasy sports operations are games of skill or chance -- and whether they should be regulated. (AP photo/Stephan Savoia)

New Jersey lawmakers are gathering information as they consider whether the state should regulate fantasy sports.

Jeremy Kudon, who represents Draft Kings, FanDuel, and the Fantasy Sports Association, told members of the Assembly Gaming Committee Monday that fantasy sports are games of skill, not games of chance.

“It’s not enough to know the most popular teams and their most recognizable stars,” Kudon said. “You need to understand scoring systems, the particular strengths of different players, the type of offensive scheme that they play in, and the quality of their matchups.”

Games of chance are subject to gambling regulations.

Assemblyman Troy Singleton said he believes chance is a factor in the outcome.

“I know the level of skill that is required to try and really put your team in the best position, and I also know that I’ve lost to my wife a bunch of times in fantasy sports,” said Singleton, D-Burlington. “And I know she doesn’t have as much skill.”

No legislation on fantasy sports in expected in New Jersey until a federal appeals court rules on the state’s effort to allow betting on sports, according to Assemblyman Ralph Caputo, committee chairman.

“Many states have decided to do different things. Some states, they believe shutting it down. Other states, they believe regulating it,” said Caputo, D-Bergen. We’re not coming to any conclusions at this point.”

Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.