Maryland mass shooting suspect to be tried in Delaware first

New Castle County Police take Radee Prince into custody last October after his capture near Newark. (John Jankowski/for WHYY)

New Castle County Police take Radee Prince into custody last October after his capture near Newark. (John Jankowski/for WHYY)

A man accused of shooting five coworkers in Maryland, killing three of them, then shooting a sixth person in Wilmington will be tried in Delaware first.

Prosecutors from the Delaware Department of Justice and the Harford County State’s Attorney’s Office released a joint statement about the criminal prosecutions of Radee Prince, on Monday afternoon.

Prince faces lesser charges in Delaware, however, the reasoning behind trying the 37-year-old in Delaware first is to ensure he can’t be paroled. Delaware’s criminal sentencing law does not provide parole, whereas parole may be available under Maryland law.

Radee Prince faces murder charges in Maryland and an attempted murder charge in Delaware after Wednesday’s rampage. (Courtesy of Wilmington Police)

“A Delaware sentence will have more certainty,” the statement read. “Prince will ultimately face trials in both states, Delaware’s proceeding will simply occur first.”

Prince faces a maximum prison term of life without parole. Prince will also face the possibility of life sentences in Maryland on the charges there.

In Delaware, Prince was charged with attempted murder, possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony, possession of a firearm by a person prohibited, carrying a concealed deadly weapon and resisting arrest.

In Maryland, Prince faces three murder charges and two counts of attempted murder.

Prince led police on a multistate manhunt last week. The shooting started on Wednesday morning at the Emmorton Business Park in Edgewood, Maryland. Police said Prince killed three of his coworkers at Advance Granite Solutions, and shot two others. Police then said Prince shot a man in Wilmington at 28th Street and Northeast Boulevard.

Wilmington Police Chief Robert Tracy said last week’s shootings were not random acts of violence, but targeted shootings.

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