Gallup polls Americans on the state of politics, jobs, and education

    Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper shows off his socks--one with Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and the other with Republican candidate Donald Trump--before entering his former brewpub for a book signing event to mark the release of his autobiography Thursday, May 26, 2016, in Denver. Hickenlooper, who is term-limited, is doing book talk rounds this week, reviving speculation that he is positioning himself to join Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign ticket. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

    Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper shows off his socks--one with Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and the other with Republican candidate Donald Trump--before entering his former brewpub for a book signing event to mark the release of his autobiography Thursday, May 26, 2016, in Denver. Hickenlooper, who is term-limited, is doing book talk rounds this week, reviving speculation that he is positioning himself to join Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign ticket. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

    NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller sits down for his weekly conversation with Gallup’s Frank Newport to talk about trends in U.S. opinion.

    Americans are happier than might be thought with their presidential choices.

    About 35 percent of poll respondents say that Donald Trump would be a terrible president; and 29 percent say Hillary Clinton would be a terrible president.  But only six percent say that both would be terrible presidents. Most like one but not the other. Still only 11 to 12 percent say either would be a great president.

    How closely are Americans following the election?

    It’s still Republicans more than Democrats.  One key is that Republicans are net positive in terms of saying that they are more enthusiastic about voting than usual, while Democrats are net negative.  If this persists, it could affect turnout.

    Regardless of who wins, the next president will need to address the priorities of the American people. 

    We have new information about the top priorities as reported to us by the American people.  The basics are similar to what they have been. Americans want to know how the new president is going to handle the economy and jobs, keep the nation safe from terrorism, and deal with education and healthcare.

    Plus immigration looms as important for some Americans.

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