City women’s commission could be revived through Philly ballot question

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 Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown talks about the need for more trash receptacles in the city. (Tom MacDonald/WHYY)

Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown talks about the need for more trash receptacles in the city. (Tom MacDonald/WHYY)

After three decades of inactivity, a Philadelphia Commission for Women may be revived.

Last week, City Council approved a charter change that paves the way for reconstitution of the commission to help work to improve conditions for women in the city’s workforce.

Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown says the commission was last operational during Mayor Bill Green’s administration in the early ’80s.

“The purpose of this is to put a permanent new department in government that focuses purely on women, the status of women, the advancement of women,” she said. “And as long as we are making 77 cents on the dollar, that suggests to me that we have work to do.”

The councilwoman says the goal is to provide a foundation for change, including building equitable opportunities for women at all levels of the city’s workforce, said Brown.

The question on changing the charter to accommodate the commission is expected to be put to voters on the May primary ballot.

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