WEB CHAT: Autism radio series

    WHYY’s Behavioral Health reporter Maiken Scott takes a look at the latest developments in the field of autism in a two-part radio series Wednesday and Thursday morning, and a live web chat Wednesday afternoon, July 22nd, 3 – 4 PM.

    WHYY’s Behavioral Health reporter Maiken Scott takes a look at the latest developments in the field of autism in a two-part radio series. Part I examines the role of the parents’ lobby in securing funding and raising awareness, and will air Wednesday July 21st at 6:33 and 8:33 AM on WHYY 91FM. Part II takes a look at the latest research in the field and will air Thursday July 22nd at 6:33 and 8:33 AM. (click here to listen live online, or catch them online after they air at whyy.org/healthscience).

    Community services, education, treatment, research – get an update on the latest developments regarding Autism Spectrum Disorders, and interact with some of the region’s leading researchers in the field. Maiken hosted a live web chat Wednesday afternoon, July 22nd, 3 – 4 PM which further explored the issues raised in her two part series. Our guests were:

    Dr. Michelle Rowe, Executive Director of the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support at St. Joseph’s University, and
    Dr. David Mandell
    , Associate Director of the Center for Autism Research at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and
    Leslie Long, Public Policy Director for Autism New Jersey.

    Click here to review the transcript of the chat.

    About one in 150 people are diagnosed with an autism each year, and the incidence has increased dramatically in the last decade. Autism today is understood not as one diagnosis, but as a spectrum of disorders, with a wide array of symptoms, and varying degrees of disability. Families, communities, schools are searching for ways to serve people affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders, and researchers are looking at causes and therapies. There is a lot of money and interest around this topic right now both nationally and right in our region. The National Institutes of Health projects that funding for autism research will rise in the coming year by $19 million, more than 13 percent. In addition, advocacy groups like Autism Speaks have committed millions in new research funding. The Delaware Valley is home to several new autism centers that are making promising discoveries.

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