Economy, government, race, immigration — Americans split on biggest complaint

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     Edwardo Clark, a Cuban-American, holds an American flag and a Cuban flag as he celebrates outside the new Cuban embassy in Washington, Monday, July 20, 2015. The United States and Cuba restored full diplomatic relations Monday after more than five decades of frosty relations rooted in the Cold War. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Edwardo Clark, a Cuban-American, holds an American flag and a Cuban flag as he celebrates outside the new Cuban embassy in Washington, Monday, July 20, 2015. The United States and Cuba restored full diplomatic relations Monday after more than five decades of frosty relations rooted in the Cold War. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Americans are quite divided over what qualifies as the most important problem facing the nation today. The economy, dysfunctional government, race relations, and immigration are all of concern.

    Gallup sees a significant shift in Americans’ attitudes towards Cuba over the years, to the point where about as many Americans now have a positive view of the country as have a negative view.

    Two momentous decisions by the Supreme Court on the Affordable Care Act and on same-sex marriage have led to major shifts in Americans’ views of the Court in general, and Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy in particular.

    President Barack Obama’s approval rating has leveled off at 46 percent, putting him well above George W. Bush and Truman at this point in their 26th quarters, but behind Reagan, Clinton and Eisenhower.

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