50% of Americans believe they have enough money to live comfortably in retirement

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     In this Tuesday, March 21, 2017, file photo, Mary Lytle-Gaines works in her office in St. Louis. With her mobile home paid off, the 61-year-old social worker had hoped to semi-retire next year and work part time, but now with insurance premiums likely to rise for her age group and income level she believes that may not be possible. (Jeff Roberson/AP Photo, file)

    In this Tuesday, March 21, 2017, file photo, Mary Lytle-Gaines works in her office in St. Louis. With her mobile home paid off, the 61-year-old social worker had hoped to semi-retire next year and work part time, but now with insurance premiums likely to rise for her age group and income level she believes that may not be possible. (Jeff Roberson/AP Photo, file)

    NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller sits down for his weekly conversation with Gallup’s Frank Newport to talk about trends in U.S. opinion.

    Is email American workers’ new scourge? New data show that the average worker spends 25 percent of his or her time doing email. France recently passed a law requiring controls on how much email workers have to do at nights and on the weekends.

    Retirement as a concept is rapidly changing. The interesting finding is that most want to continue working in one way or the other; relatively few want to stop cold turkey.

    The desired retirement age has gone from 60 to 66 over the past two decades. Meanwhile, the average retired person today says he or she retired at 61.

    Will you have enough money to live comfortably when you retire? The percent who say “yes” had fallen to as low as 38 percent a few years ago, but is climbing back up now to over 50 percent. Still, a lot of American workers say they won’t.

    Speaking of sources of income, what is the best investment advice from the people? Put your money in stocks, real estate, gold, or under the mattress? Despite the big run up in the stock market in recent months (and the over-time gains), the people of the United States say real estate investment is better than stocks. Young people are more into savings accounts, and conservatives are more into gold.

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