The rise of the QAnon conspiracy theory

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FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2018, file photo, David Reinert holding a Q sign waits in line with others to enter a campaign rally with President Donald Trump in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. A far-right conspiracy theory forged in a dark corner of the internet is creeping into the mainstream political arena. It's called QAnon, and it centers on the baseless belief that President Donald Trump is waging a secret campaign against enemies in the “deep state.”  (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2018, file photo, David Reinert holding a Q sign waits in line with others to enter a campaign rally with President Donald Trump in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. A far-right conspiracy theory forged in a dark corner of the internet is creeping into the mainstream political arena. It's called QAnon, and it centers on the baseless belief that President Donald Trump is waging a secret campaign against enemies in the “deep state.” (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Guests: Alex Kaplan, Daniel Jolley
The expansive conspiracy theory QAnon has been gaining influence over the past few years, and now it’s gaining popularity in the Republican Party, with GOP candidates espousing its unfounded claims. President Trump’s former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn recently posted a video of him and his family taking an oath to QAnon as well. Today on the show we’ll hear about how the conspiracy theory developed and the political candidates who ascribe to it. Our guests will be ALEX KAPLAN, senior researcher for Media Matters, and DANIEL JOLLEY, a psychologist at Northumbira University who examines the thinking that leads people to believe in conspiracy theories. 

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