The Mueller Report

Listen 49:49
Special counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election as released on Thursday, April 18, 2019, is photographed in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)

Special counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election as released on Thursday, April 18, 2019, is photographed in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)

Guests: Craig Green, Sarah N. Lynch

The full version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 Presidential campaign was made public yesterday. The report was intended to determine the degree to which the Russian government attempted to sway the election towards President Trump, if the Trump campaign cooperated with them in these efforts and if the President attempted to obstruct justice by intentionally stymieing  the subsequent investigation. Attorney General William Barr and President Trump have proclaimed that the report exonerates the president of any wrongdoing. But Mueller’s findings are not so clear cut. While Mueller did not call for bringing criminal charges against the president, there was “conscious wrongdoing.” We asked Reuters’ criminal justice reporter, SARAH N. LYNCH, to describe the key parts of the reports and Temple University law professor and former D.O.J. staffer, CRAIG GREEN to explain the legal questions it raises.

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