The Freeh report’s damning conclusions about Penn State’s Sandusky scandal

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A young boy places a yellow rose at the foot of a statue of former Penn State head football coach Joe Paterno outside Beaver Stadium in State College, Pa., Thursday, July 12, 2012. After an eight-month inquiry, former FBI director Louis Freeh's firm produced a 267-page report that concluded that Paterno and other top Penn State officials hushed up child sex abuse allegations against former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky for more than a decade for fear of bad publicity, allowing Sandusky to prey on other youngsters. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Hour 1

Last month, former Penn State football defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky was convicted of 45 counts of child sexual abuse, for a reign of terror in his home, in his car and in the locker room of Penn State’s football team, among other crime scenes. Yesterday, former FBI director Louis Freeh made public the report (pdf) he conducted on behalf of Penn State’s Board of Trustees, into how Sandusky was able to avoid prosecution after school administrators first learned of a police investigation in 1998. Now former Penn State President Graham B. Spanier, former Athletic Director Tim Curley and Gary Schultz, a university vice president once in charge of the campus police, are under investigation, but Freeh said they “never demonstrated, through actions or words, any concern for the safety and well-being of Sandusky’s victims until after Sandusky’s arrest.” Also indicted for his actions and inaction was the late football coaching legend Joe Paterno, who died in January after the Board of Trustees forced him out in the wake of the Sandusky scandal. Joining us to explain the Freeh report, the ongoing case against Penn State administrators and the tarnished legacy of “JoePa” are three reporters: NPR’s JEFF BRADY; BILL MOUSHEY, former longtime investigative reporter for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and co-author of “Game Over: Jerry Sandusky, Penn State, and the Culture of Silence;” and JEFF FRANTZ, an enterprise reporter who is part of the Harrisburg Patriot-News’ Pulitzer Prize-winning team covering the Sandusky scandal.

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[audio: 071312_100630.mp3]

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