Poisoned spy inflames U.K. – Russia relations

Listen 13:58
Soldiers wearing protective clothing prepare to lift a tow truck in Hyde Road, Gillingham, Dorset, England as the investigation into the suspected nerve agent attack on Russian double agent Sergei Skripal continues Wednesday March 14, 2018.  The army cordoned off a road in Dorset on Wednesday as the investigated the attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. Authorities have cordoned off several sites in and near Salisbury, 90 miles (145 kilometers) southwest of London as part of their probe.  (Andrew Matthews/PA via AP)

Soldiers wearing protective clothing prepare to lift a tow truck in Hyde Road, Gillingham, Dorset, England as the investigation into the suspected nerve agent attack on Russian double agent Sergei Skripal continues Wednesday March 14, 2018. The army cordoned off a road in Dorset on Wednesday as the investigated the attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. Authorities have cordoned off several sites in and near Salisbury, 90 miles (145 kilometers) southwest of London as part of their probe. (Andrew Matthews/PA via AP)

Guest: Richard Pérez-Peña

We talk about the nerve agent attack on a former spy and his daughter in Salisbury, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May has attributed the attack to the Russian government and expelled 23 Russian diplomats as recourse. We’ll talk with RICHARD PEREZ-PENA, a news editor for The New York Times, about the attack, its intent, and what effect it will have on Russia’s relationship with the U.K. and the rest of the world.

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