Trump's popularity; JFK conspiracies; and reports of sexual harassment in the workplace — Americans weigh in

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President John F. Kennedy, c. 1962 and President Donald Trump, c. 2017 ( (stf and Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photos)

President John F. Kennedy, c. 1962 and President Donald Trump, c. 2017 ( (stf and Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photos)

NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller sits down for his weekly conversation with Gallup’s Frank Newport to talk about trends in U.S. opinion.

Next Wednesday marks one year since Donald Trump prevailed at the polls. Newport says he wouldn’t rule out the same result if the election was held again this year.

He notes that  Trump was a very unpopular candidate when he won (the most unpopular in history), and is unpopular now based on brand new data, so that hasn’t changed. Trump also lost the popular vote a year ago, but squeaked through in the Electoral College, primarily based on the Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan votes. His supporters have stuck with him enough in those states that he could prevail again now.

In 1998, 55 percent of women said that sexual harassment in the workplace was a major problem. Now that number has jumped to 73 percent. For men, 45 percent said it was a major problem then, 66 percent say that’s the case today. In addition, 42 percent of women nationwide say they have been the victim of sexual harassment; 11 percent of men say they have been the victim of sexual harassment.

The government recently, as mandated by the “JFK Records Act,” released some of the remaining documents relating to the Kennedy assassination back in 1963.

On the 50th anniversary of the assassination in 2013, Gallup found that more than six in 10 Americans still felt that there was a conspiracy involving more than just one man (Lee Harvey Oswald) and that the most likely groups involved in his assassination on that fateful day in Dallas, Texas, were the Mafia, the government, the CIA, or Cuba and Fidel Castro.

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