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‘For the young and the young at heart’: Wilmington takes a musical twist on playing in the park

Drums and other instruments installed by the Rotary Club of Wilmington at H. Fletcher Brown Park on the northern edge of downtown Wilmington will allow visitors of all ages to discover their inner musician. (Mark Eichmann/WHYY)

Drums and other instruments installed by the Rotary Club of Wilmington at H. Fletcher Brown Park on the northern edge of downtown Wilmington will allow visitors of all ages to discover their inner musician. (Mark Eichmann/WHYY)

H. Fletcher Brown Park is a quiet open space on the northern edge of downtown Wilmington. A new addition to the small park could make it a bit noisier.

Earlier this week, the Rotary Club of Wilmington unveiled some outdoor musical instruments designed to fill the park with sound and give children and adults a chance to discover their inner percussionist.

The instruments include drums, contrabass chimes, xylophone, and steel drum-type structures. Mayor Mike Purzycki said the instruments serve a dual purpose.

“They’re beautiful in addition to being functional,” he said. “So even if somebody like myself is not going to be able to go out there and make these instruments sound appealing from anybody else’s ear, they’re beautiful.”

Drums and other instruments installed by the Rotary Club of Wilmington at H. Fletcher Brown Park on the northern edge of downtown Wilmington will allow visitors of all ages to discover their inner musician. (Mark Eichmann/WHYY)

The instruments were designed in consultation with school leaders at the nearby Community Education Building and Freire Charter School, which is located in a building next to the park.

“This new installation is designed to promote both community and creativity at the park for the young and the young at heart,” said Lisa Detwiler, Rotary Club of Wilmington president. “We hope these new instruments will be used to create and strengthen bonds of friendship in this community.”

The instruments were dedicated to longtime club member Jonathan Whitcomb. He received the group’s highest honor for service in July, just before his death.

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