February 6, 2017: Hero-worshipping the social entrepreneur, mystery of the plug weld continued, the eighth victim of the Salvation Army building collapse

Decades-old plug welds may be the culprits for the Delaware River Bridge closure in January. Officials continue to gather clues to find what caused the steel truss fracture; the source, the Inquirer reports, could have ramifications for similar bridges across the country.

Domenic Vitiello recently wrote about the role of immigrants and immigrant-owned business in Philadelphia’s revival for Eyes on the Street. The careful coverage on the highly anticipated Chinatown Square exemplifies just that—immigrant business owners David Taing and Kenny Poon were able to attract Philadelphia and New York-based food vendors to open up shop in the neighborhood’s first 24-hour food court, proving that Philly has the population and nightlife culture to pull it off.

Last week, a civil jury found all five defendants liable for the Salvation Army building collapse. Inga Saffron tells the story of demolition contractor Griffin Campbell, the only person who was tried and convicted in this group-enabled tragedy, who she argues is a victim too—of the judicial system.

The term ‘social entrepreneurship’ has joined the vernacular of the American Dream and with it comes the question of its role in building sustainable societies. Jerry Silberman of Grid Magazine cautions against idolizing “the entrepreneur as a role model and hero who will solve social problems” and makes the case for society’s collective responsibility to drive consumer lifestyle changes.

Sunday was a big day for fans of sports and expensive commercials. Curbed Philly takes us down memory lane with pictures and histories of six stadiums of Philadelphia past, from Frankford Stadium to the short-lived Columbia Park.

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