Delaware Gov. Carney tests positive for COVID-19, says his symptoms are mild

Delaware Gov. John Carney speaks at a podium

Delaware Gov. John Carney gives the State of State Address in the Senate Chambers at Legislative Hall in Dover, Del. (Jason Minto/State of Delaware)

Delaware Gov. John Carney is experiencing mild COVID-19 symptoms after testing positive Monday, and will work remotely for the time being, his office announced.

The announcement comes amid a sharp rise in cases, hospitalizations, and positivity rates across the state over the last two months.

The governor, who turns 66 on Friday, learned he had contracted the coronavirus by taking an at-home antigen test after he began feeling ill, spokesperson Emily David said. She did not detail his symptoms.

Carney, who was elected to his second four-year term in 2020, is fully vaccinated and double boosted. He is “currently isolating” and following U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance, David said.

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“I am feeling well and will continue to work remotely, but unfortunately will have to miss a few in-person events,” Carney said in a statement issued by David.

The governor had been scheduled to join students, educators, and other politicians Tuesday morning at the former Hockessin Colored School #107, to celebrate Brown v. Board of Education Day.

As of Monday, the state Division of Public Health reported that an average of 494 residents had contracted COVID-19 over the previous week — a 697% increase over the 62 cases on March 27.

The case totals do not count the people who, like the governor, were diagnosed via at-home tests, public health officials said.

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A total of 122 patients are currently hospitalized — a 510% increase over the 22 on March 27.

In addition, the positivity rate is 17.6% — 529% higher than the 2.8% recorded on March 27.

Over the last three months, one Delawarean has died every six days from coronavirus-related causes, raising the total since the first case in March 2020 to 2,931.

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