‘Bridgegate’ expected to narrow Christie opportunities in Trump White House

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie pumps his fist as President-elect Donald Trump gives his acceptance speech during his election night rally in New York. (AP Photo/John Locher)

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie pumps his fist as President-elect Donald Trump gives his acceptance speech during his election night rally in New York. (AP Photo/John Locher)

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was one of the first Republican candidates to drop out of the primary race and support Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

Now there’s speculation over what role he might get in the Trump administration.

But the “Bridgegate” scandal and convictions of the governor’s former allies may prevent Christie from getting a Cabinet appointment, said Fairleigh Dickinson political science professor Peter Woolley.

“The Republicans are not going to be able to put forward any nominee they want through the Senate because they simply don’t have enough senators to defeat a filibuster,” Woolley said. “So if Christie still reeks of Bridgegate by the time a nomination is made, the Senate will push back and make a big deal of it.”

Seton Hall political science professor Matthew Hale agreed that Christie would face some difficulties getting any position that would require Senate confirmation.

“Some of the things that came out about Bridgegate, his incredibly low poll numbers, I think he might still have some problems,” Hale said. “But I ‘m not sure that he’s not going to end up as chief of staff. I think that’s a real possibility.”

Rider University political science professor Ben Dworkin said he doubted Christie would resign to take a Trump administration job because he has the opportunity to make a large income after his term as governor ends in January 2018.

“I’m not sure he wants to go back and have a very high-profile job, but nonetheless have a relatively — for what he can command in the private sector — a small salary,” Dworkin said.

Christie already has a powerful role as Trump’s transition chairman in suggesting appointees for thousands of federal government positions.

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