DOJ releases Mueller report on investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election

Attorney General William Barr speaks about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report during a news conference, Thursday, April 18, 2019, at the Department of Justice in Washington. (Patrick Semansky/AP Photo)

Attorney General William Barr speaks about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report during a news conference, Thursday, April 18, 2019, at the Department of Justice in Washington. (Patrick Semansky/AP Photo)

Updated: 12:45 p.m.

After nearly two years of waiting, America is getting some Trump-Russia answers straight from Robert Mueller.

The Justice Department posted a redacted version of the report online Thursday morning, 90 minutes after Attorney General William Barr offered his own final assessment of the findings.

Read the redacted report below.

Attorney General William Barr says a version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report with fewer redactions will be made available to a small group of lawmakers.

In a letter to Congress on Thursday, Barr says the second version of the report would be given to the “Gang of Eight,” the top-ranking House and Senate lawmakers from both parties who can view sensitive classified information. The chairs and ranking members of the House and Senate judiciary committees will also receive it.

Barr said all redactions would be removed from that version of the report except those relating to grand-jury information.

The attorney general said, “I do not believe that I have discretion to disclose grand-jury information to Congress. Nevertheless, this accommodation will allow you to review the bulk of the redacted material for yourselves.”

Democrats want the full report released.

Barr says he and deputy Rod Rosenstein disagreed with some of special counsel Robert Mueller’s “legal theories” pertaining to obstruction of justice, but that didn’t influence their decision that President Donald Trump didn’t commit a crime.

In a press conference ahead of the report’s expected release, Barr says Mueller reviewed 10 episodes as part of his investigation into whether Trump committed obstruction of justice. Barr says he and Rosenstein “felt that some of the episodes examined did not amount to obstruction as a matter of law.”

The attorney general maintains that they set their feelings on the matter aside and accepted Mueller’s “legal framework for purposes of our analysis” when they determined that the evidence gathered by Mueller was “not sufficient to establish” that Trump had violated the law.

The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee is asking special counsel Robert Mueller to testify before his panel as soon as possible about his report on the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Chairman Jerrold Nadler released a three-sentence letter to Mueller requesting his appearance, minutes after Attorney General William Barr ended a news conference in which he described the special counsel’s report. The New York Democrat tweeted that Congress and the public need to hear directly from Mueller to “better understand his findings.”

Nadler wrote in his letter that he wants Mueller to testify by May 23 and asked for his “prompt attention” to the request.

Barr said at his news conference that he did not object to Mueller testifying.

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