This week in science: Big Bang breakthrough, ancient moss and heart tissue that beats

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    This graphic provided by NASA illustrates the idea that the expansion of the universe over most of it's history has been relatively gradual. The notion that a rapid period

    This graphic provided by NASA illustrates the idea that the expansion of the universe over most of it's history has been relatively gradual. The notion that a rapid period "inflation" preceded the Big Bang expansion was first put forth 25 years ago. (AP Photo/NASA)

    The Scientist’s Kerry Grens updates us on big news from the cosmology field and explains new efforts to create tissue that mimics the human heart. 

    This was a big week for those in the cosmology field and science lovers alike. 

    On Monday, researchers announced the detection of gravitational ripples originating from the Big Bang.  

    The news struck many by surprise, including Andrei Dmitriyevich Linde – one of the main authors of the inflationary universe theory.  

    Kerry Grens, an associate editor at The Scientist and a regular Pulse contributor, explains the discovery in more detail to Pulse host Maiken Scott. 

    Grens also describes new research documenting the resurrection of Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years and details scientific efforts to engineer tissue that closely mimics a natural heart muscle that beats. 

    Click on the yellow audio icon above to hear the full interview. 

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