Atlantic City resident Ralph Hunter shares memories of The March on Washington

    Ralph Hunter on the boardwalk at Caspian Avenue beach. (J. Woods/NewsWorks)

    Ralph Hunter on the boardwalk at Caspian Avenue beach. (J. Woods/NewsWorks)

    Fifty years ago today, Ralph Hunter, then 25 years old, attended the March on Washington with his father, a Philadelphia minister. Producer Jeanette Woods interviewed Hunter on the windy boardwalk near his Atlantic City home, and asked him to think back to that day and share his impressions and the personal significance of “The Dream at 50”.

     

    To commemorate the 50th anniversary of The March on Washington, this week we’ve been looking at the legacy of civil rights and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s iconic dream speech. For some people it’s about memories, for others it is about the long term impact on their lives and in their communities.

    For Ralph Hunter of Atlantic City, it’s about both.

    Fifty years ago today, Hunter, then 25 years old, attended the March with his father, a Philadelphia minister. Producer Jeanette Woods interviewed Hunter on the windy boardwalk near his home, and asked him to think back to that day and share his impressions and the personal significance of “The Dream at 50”.

    Ralph Hunter is Founder and Director of the African American Heritage Museum of Southern New Jersey. The second location of the museum is scheduled to open in Atlantic City this October.

    You can join in the conversation at our Facebook page or send us a tweet with hash tag #dreamat50.

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