Marijuana in the Trump age

Listen 49:27
A marijuana plants stands amid a plantation discovered near San Quintin in Baja California state, Mexico, Friday, July 15, 2011. Soldiers have found the largest marijuana plantation ever detected in Mexico, a huge field covering almost 300 acres (120 hectares), covered by shaded netting, the Defense Department said Thursday. The plantation is four times larger than the previous record discovery by authorities at a ranch in northern Chihuahua state in 1984. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

A marijuana plants stands amid a plantation discovered near San Quintin in Baja California state, Mexico, Friday, July 15, 2011. Soldiers have found the largest marijuana plantation ever detected in Mexico, a huge field covering almost 300 acres (120 hectares), covered by shaded netting, the Defense Department said Thursday. The plantation is four times larger than the previous record discovery by authorities at a ranch in northern Chihuahua state in 1984. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

Guests: John Hudak, James Higdon, Robert Mikos

Attorney Jeff Sessions announced last week that the Justice Department will be reversing the previous administration’s approach to marijuana. The Obama DOJ unofficially allowed states to determine their own approach to marijuana policy, but Sessions plans on enforcing the federal law that classifies cannabis as a ‘schedule one’ drug alongside heroin. JAMES HIGDON who writes about drug policy for POLITICO, and ROBERT MIKOS, constitutional law scholar from Vanderbilt University, join us to discuss the ins-and-outs of Sessions’ plans, and what happens when federal and state laws conflict. But first, we’ll talk with JOHN HUDAK of Brookings about how the roll-out of recreational marijuana has looked like in the states that have voted to approve such measures.

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