‘Radio Times’ examines higher education policy in the age of Trump

 President Donald Trump listens as Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks during a meeting with parents and teachers, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump listens as Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks during a meeting with parents and teachers, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Education policy in America could be transformed under President Trump and newly minted Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, including the government’s attitude toward for-profit colleges.

On “Radio Times” Wednesday, host Marty Moss-Coane asked Sara Goldrick-Rab, a professor of education and sociology at Temple University, about where for-profit colleges should fit within the broader landscape of higher education.

While talking about the taxpayer burden of for-profit colleges, Goldrick-Rab said, “If we stopped funding for-profit colleges and universities in the United States using taxpayer dollars, we could re-allocate those funds to pay for the 13th year of higher education in the public sector for virtually everyone.”

 

Later in the show, Marty was joined by Aaron Schenk, who advocates on behalf of private career colleges and schools as executive director of the Pennsylvania Association of Private School Administrators. Marty asked Schenk about his perspective on the now-defunct Trump University, which recently paid $25 million to settle accusations of fraud.

Schenk said that Trump U “was not a for-profit college or university,” adding that it “was an un-accredited real estate seminar. It had nothing to do with or look like any of our schools. The reason why it got in trouble in New York is because it used the name ‘university,’ even though it was not a college or school.”

 

Listen to the full hour of Radio Times.

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