Report: N.J. budget cuts spell trouble for state’s poorest

    A new report raises concerns that poverty in New Jersey may increase even as the economy improves.
    The Poverty Research Institute at Legal Services of New Jersey says about 9 percent of the state’s residents live in poverty. The group expects that number to increase because employment usually does not gain until months after the economy starts to pick up.

    A new report raises concerns that poverty in New Jersey may increase even as the economy improves.

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    The Poverty Research Institute at Legal Services of New Jersey says about 9 percent of the state’s residents live in poverty. The group expects that number to increase because employment usually does not gain until months after the economy starts to pick up.
    Sabine Schoenbach is a research analyst for the group.

    Schoenbach: The current economic climate has created an increased need for government assistance programs as well as a reduced capacity to fund them. Reconciling these opposing forces presents an immediate challenge for state government.

    Advocates say state budget concerns may mean even more hardship for the poor. They’re urging the state to develop a comprehensive plan to provide assistance for those most in need.

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