Pink or blue? Some gender reveal parties take dangerous turn

In this frame grab from a April 23, 2017, video provided by the U.S. Forest Service, is a gender reveal event in the Santa Rita Mountain's foothills, more than 40 miles southeast of Tucson, Ariz. The explosion from the reveal ignited the 47,000-acre Sawmill Fire. (U.S. Forest Service via AP Photos)

In this frame grab from a April 23, 2017, video provided by the U.S. Forest Service, is a gender reveal event in the Santa Rita Mountain's foothills, more than 40 miles southeast of Tucson, Ariz. The explosion from the reveal ignited the 47,000-acre Sawmill Fire. (U.S. Forest Service via AP Photos)

It was supposed to be a happy moment, a chance to declare the sex of a soon-to-be-born baby with a blast of color and burst of attention on social media.

But the gender reveal party explosion that killed an Iowa woman last weekend highlights the extreme lengths to which some families go to advertise on social media that they’re expecting a boy or a girl.

Gender reveal parties have grown increasingly popular and elaborate, with smoke, confetti or colored treats to symbolize the soon-to-be-born child’s biological sex. But what began as a lighthearted, intimate gathering with family and close friends has morphed into a spectacle with guns, explosives and wild animals to maximize shock value — with sometimes dangerous consequences.

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