NWS: Rip currents will be “life-threatening” to anyone who enters ocean today

     Building surf during sunrise in South Seaside Park Wednesday morning. (Photo: Justin Auciello/JSHN)

    Building surf during sunrise in South Seaside Park Wednesday morning. (Photo: Justin Auciello/JSHN)

    An approaching coastal low pressure system that will bring wind and rain to the area Wednesday evening through Thursday is likely to produce an extended period of dangerous rip currents, forecasters say.

    The risk of rip currents will increase from south to north during the day Wednesday, according to a bulletin from the National Weather Service.

    Waves will build to five to seven feet due to east winds at 15 to 25 miles per hour, gusting to 35 miles per hour, the bulletin advises. 

    “A high risk of rip currents implies that wind and/or wave conditions will support the development of very strong rip currents. These rip currents will be life threatening to anyone who enters the surf,” the bulletin advises. 

    Rip currents are powerful channels of water flowing quickly away from the shore, often occurring in low spots or breaks in the sandbar and in the vicinity of structures such as groins, jetties, and piers.

    There will be at least a moderate risk of rip currents Thursday, with possibly an enhanced risk lingering into Friday, according to the bulletin.

    The National Weather Service does not expect tidal flooding levels to reach the minor flood stage, although forecasters continue to monitor the risk. 

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