Nurses are No. 1 on honesty/ethics scale

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     Julietta Losoyo, right, a registered nurse at the San Diego Public Health Center gives Derek Lucero a whooping cough injection while in his fathers Leonel's arms as his brother Iker, 2, looks on in San Diego. California is battling the worst whooping cough epidemic recorded in the state in seven decades. State officials place much of the blame on a vaccine introduced in the 1990s that researchers say doesn't seem to be working as well as expected. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)

    Julietta Losoyo, right, a registered nurse at the San Diego Public Health Center gives Derek Lucero a whooping cough injection while in his fathers Leonel's arms as his brother Iker, 2, looks on in San Diego. California is battling the worst whooping cough epidemic recorded in the state in seven decades. State officials place much of the blame on a vaccine introduced in the 1990s that researchers say doesn't seem to be working as well as expected. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)

    There’s a lot to choose from when Americans are asked to name the most important problem facing the country today. One big change this month is issues relating to race, which have zoomed up to be the third most frequently mentioned problem – after dysfunctional government and the economy.

    Also, reaction is generally positive to President Barack Obama’s announced intent to restore diplomatic relations with Cuba, although it falls on fairly predictable party lines.

    And Gallup’s annual study on perceived honesty and ethics of professions ranges from nurses (top) to congressional members and car salesmen (bottom).

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