New Jersey begins tackling thousands of potholes

One of the New Jersey Department of Transportation pothole repair machines is at work. (NJDOT)

One of the New Jersey Department of Transportation pothole repair machines is at work. (NJDOT)

You don’t have to travel very far to find one. Potholes are ubiquitous this time of year, and they pose a hazard for motorists. The New Jersey Transportation Department is coming to the rescue as it begins its annual repair campaign.

 

 

Transportation Department spokesman Steve Schapiro said the January blizzard, several rainstorms, and wide variations in temperature during the winter produced a massive number of potholes.

“That always is difficult on our roads. When you’ve got water that then freezes after it seeps into cracks, it’ll expand and damage the roadways,” he said. “So there are a lot of potholes out there.”

Pothole-filling machines and crews with shovels will repair about 250,000 potholes on interstates and state highways in New Jersey this year, Schapiro said.

“In the past two years, we’ve spent approximately $3 million each year to repair the potholes,” he said. “In a typical year, it’s closer to $2 million.”

Sal Risalvato, the executive director of the New Jersey Gasoline, Convenience Store, and Automotive Association, said those potholes can also be expensive for drivers.

“If a tire is damaged that could be $150 or $200. Rims can be upwards of $500,” he said. “If any other components such as spindles or tie rods are bent, those can be a few hundred dollars as well.”

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